Forums RPGMP3 Podcast Audio Actual Play Recordings RPGMP3 Dungeons and Dragons Next (5e) Lost Mine of Phandelver Session 25

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  • #561011
    Hal
    Admin
    • Posts : 7753
    • Treant

    File Name: Lost Mine of Phandelver Session 25

    File Submitter: Hal

    File Submitted: 01 Jul 2015

    File Category: Dungeons and Dragons Next (5e)

    Genre: Fantasy

    Profanity Level: Jolly Sweary Indeed

    https://www.rpgmp3.com/files/game_recordings/RPGMP3/audio/lost_mines_of_phandelver_session_25.mp3

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RL83AOf9qks

    The party complete the clearing of the mine and discuss how to proceed. With the adventure complete we end with a short review of the scenario and D&D5 as a whole.

    Click here to download this file

    #649241
    Pencil-Monkey
    • Posts : 5728
    • Mind Flayer

    The party complete the clearing of the mine and discuss how to proceed. With the adventure complete we end with a short review of the scenario and D&D5 as a whole.

     

    Congratulations! That scenario didn’t even take a full year to finish. 😉 (Ten days less than a year, in fact.) 😛

    You could also consider posting the review/discussion at the end as a separate video file, to encourage people to join that discussion even if they haven’t listened to all 25 episodes first.

    #649242
    Hal
    Admin
    • Posts : 7753
    • Treant

    Good idea Monkey – I’ll see if I can carve it off but it really isn’t much of a review – we might want to get together and have a more serious conversation about that 😀

     

    Hal :hal:

    #649243
    Lockhart
    • Posts : 1293
    • Owlbear

    we might want to get together and have a more serious conversation about that 😀

     

    Hal :hal:

    Read: find a strong-willed forceful mediator to make Hal and me speak separately instead of jumping over each other’s opinions. XP

    #649244
    Hal
    Admin
    • Posts : 7753
    • Treant

    Yeah – pretty what Lockhart said 😛

     

    Hal :hal:

    #649245
    PrestoJeff
    • Posts : 447
    • Thri-kreen

    As a non-player of 5E, I found it easy to follow the system as you were playing it.  It seems that 5E is trying to have simpler mechanics than Pathfinder, and from what I could tell, it seems to have succeeded.

     

    I wasn’t quite sure what Lockhart was trying to say re: story-telling mechanics built into the system. Do you have any examples of successful story-telling systems?

    #649246
    Lockhart
    • Posts : 1293
    • Owlbear

    As a non-player of 5E, I found it easy to follow the system as you were playing it.  It seems that 5E is trying to have simpler mechanics than Pathfinder, and from what I could tell, it seems to have succeeded.

     

    I wasn’t quite sure what Lockhart was trying to say re: story-telling mechanics built into the system. Do you have any examples of successful story-telling systems?

    FATE and Inspectres come to mind, I’m sure Burning Wheel fits too from what I’ve heard of it. Basically FATE and Inspectres both look at the game as a shared story instead a series of obstacles made by the GM for players to overcome. They encourage players to think of the story from a macro perspective instead of the purely micro player perspective. In Fate for instance, a major component of the game are FATE points. There passage from player to GMs help to facilitate a story where players have situations they succeed, and also situations that become very difficult. Each character has aspects, some positive, some double-sided, and some flaws. When aspects are invoked against players, they regain the fate points needed to activate the positive aspects. The game outright says that players are therefore encouraged to mention their character flaws and play them up to get the fate points they’ll need later. If players consistently avoid playing a characters flaws and avoid story pitfalls, they’ll soon find theirselves crippled in options when a challenge comes along.

    #649247
    PrestoJeff
    • Posts : 447
    • Thri-kreen

    Okay, I see what you mean.  Characters in 5E don’t really have “flaws”, do they?  Or if they do, there’s no basis for using them as a system mechanic, is that what you’re saying?

     

    Would you agree that systems like GURPS or Savage Worlds, which do have character creation mechanics for having flaws, still don’t have a basis for using them as a system mechanic for story purposes, but might be “better” than 5E in that area?

    #649248
    Lockhart
    • Posts : 1293
    • Owlbear

    Okay, I see what you mean.  Characters in 5E don’t really have “flaws”, do they?  Or if they do, there’s no basis for using them as a system mechanic, is that what you’re saying?

     

    Would you agree that systems like GURPS or Savage Worlds, which do have character creation mechanics for having flaws, still don’t have a basis for using them as a system mechanic for story purposes, but might be “better” than 5E in that area?

    5e does have a flaw system (I think I mention the characterization system of 5e as something I really like and would almost house rule it as a complete alternative for alignment). But the effect on the game is minor and it can easily be ignored.

    My understanding of Gurps flaws is that it’s “role play it or the GM hits you with books and takes away points”. Savage worlds however, from what I recall, is more of a middle grounds between story and system.

    I think the overall thrust of my point is that the core system of 5e doesn’t necessarily support storytelling. It may inspire a GM or players to have more focus, but that is more of “having a favourite playstyle” as opposed to a inherent feature of the system.

    that being said, not sure how much I can go into this purely off a comment from the audio. Not sure if I misspoke there. Happy to start a 5e conversation from a fresh point, here or in a new thread

    #649249
    Dr Ink’n’Stain
    • Posts : 31
    • Flumph

    Haven’t read the adventure, but from the audio, I think the most memorable bits were the Nothic, which was a completly new creature for me, the halfling kid and perhaps the Banshee. And I suppose these were 10% adventure as written / 90% pure Hal -moments. Overall, it had a strong Designed by Committee feel about it, it seemed to lack any clear direction in what it was trying to accomplish. A tighter focus would probably have helped a lot. And better dungeon design, apparently. I’m not sure the low-level adversaries were the problem, it’s more how the monsters are written in the adventure rather than the creatures itself. Although going all Tucker’s Kobolds in the introductory adventure might have been tad cruel.

     

    As for 5e, for me it hits near the sweet spot between complexity and ease-of-use, in the sense that I could see myself both playing and running a game with it. I like that they chose a bit lighter approach this time, and I especially like that the free-for-all multiclassing is an optional rule now. I never liked it, not thematically nor mechanically; why play a class-and-level game, if the classes are just collection of abilities to cherry-pick the best combos from. I also tend to houserule my games a lot, and it is always easier to add stuff to simpler systems rather than to take stuff away from more complex ones. 5e is not without it’s flaws (eg. Things I Do Not Like), but the core system is simple enough and robust enough to fiddle with. Although 5e will most likely be my first and last D&D core system I’m going to own. 

     

    But yeah, thanks Hal and the players for a very in-depth intro adventure and analysis, and the different player styles and personalities gave a nice stress test to different aspects of the system. It was not the only review of 5e that I followed, but without the doubt the most entertaining.

    #649250
    Reverse
    • Posts : 46
    • Flumph

    My understanding of Gurps flaws is that it’s “role play it or the GM hits you with books and takes away points”. Savage worlds however, from what I recall, is more of a middle grounds between story and system.

     

    Gurps offers you extra character building points for taking flaws, which you’re then expected to roleplay. Several of them allow the GM to simply do things (because you have an Enemy, he shows up), while others are expected to roleplay (Depression) with no mechanical penalties except for the GM grumping at you if you don’t do it right. As such, it’s very easy to break by simply taking a giant pile of flaws that will either never come up or are transparently obvious (taking a Phobia of Vampires in a spy game, taking Enemy: The Campaign Villian You’ll Be Fighting Anyway). And because the flaws aren’t particularly limited, this is where the old joke comes in about playing a one-armed wheelchair-bound mute alcholic foreign midget with a crippling phobia of worms, because that lets you min-max his powers to the point where he can read minds, use telekinesis and fly, overcoming all his supposed flaws.

     

    Savage Worlds falls somewhere between this and FATE. You have a limited number of Hindrances you can take, which allow you some extra build points at the start. Some mechnically penalise you (you’re Gutless, -2 to all Fear checks), or are expected to be roleplayed (you’re Loyal, you won’t leave a man behind). The GM is expected to pay you out in Bennies (reroll tokens), however, when you roleplay your flaw properly.

     

    FATE, for those interested, offers no build points for your Aspects, but pays out reroll tokens on the spot as and when these come up. So if you don’t play into your flaws, you never get Fate Points to power you up. The GM can also just use them as story establishment. One that’s come up plenty of times in my games is “Sucker For A Pretty Face”, where the hero gets lured into a dark alley by the beautiful woman, jumped by thugs, and has the Plot Object stolen off him. The GM simply offers up a Fate Point, and says “Because you’re a sucker, you never think this could be a trap…” and moves ahead with the story, without bothering to give the player, say, a Perception check to see the thugs, or checks to soak the damage. Of course, the player has the option to reject the Fate Point – “I am a sucker, but with the Object of Doom in my possession, I’m more suspicious than usual…”

     

    Fate works the best for it, but is a very story orientated game when laid up against DnD. Savage Worlds is a good option between them.

    #649251
    Slartibartfast
    • Posts : 905
    • Gelatinous Cube

    What I want to know is when is Cockeny’s v. Cthulhu coming out?

    #649252
    Lockhart
    • Posts : 1293
    • Owlbear

    What I want to know is when is Cockeny’s v. Cthulhu coming out?

    Yeah, we played that one-shot ages ago, it never got released for some reason…

    #649253
    Hal
    Admin
    • Posts : 7753
    • Treant

    Yeah – I don’t know either – was the audio bad? Let me take a look on the storage drive at home and see if I can dig it out…

     

    Hal

    #649254
    clambake
    • Posts : 4
    • Commoner

    What is next for you guys?  Need my RPG real play fix!

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